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Enraged Leftists Use Racial Slurs Against Black Conservative Who Delivered Rebuttal to Biden

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Twitter wallowed in racial invective after Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina delivered the GOP’s rebuttal to President Joe Biden’s Wednesday night address.

Scott, a black conservative, used part of his speech to push back against the Democratic notion that America has become so racially polarized the only route to the future is paved with high-cost social programs and set-asides for minorities.

Twitter convulsed at the concept that a black man was not indicting white America, so much so that the phrase “Uncle Tim” was trending.

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Some voices noted that the spree of name-calling seemed to violate Twitter’s rules.

Others pointed out that the racism seemed to flow from the left, which allegedly hates it.

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During his speech, Scott took on the issue of race.

“Nowhere do we need common ground more desperately than in our discussions of race. I have experienced the pain of discrimination. I know what it feels like to be pulled over for no reason. To be followed around a store while I’m shopping,” he said.

“I’ve also experienced a different kind of intolerance. I get called ‘Uncle Tom’ and the n-word by progressives, by liberals. Just last week, a national newspaper suggested my family’s poverty was actually privilege because a relative owned land generations before my time,” Scott added.

“Believe me, I know firsthand our healing is not finished. In 2015, after the shooting of Walter Scott, I wrote a bill to fund body cameras. Last year, after the deaths of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, I built an even bigger police reform proposal.

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“But my Democratic colleagues blocked it. I extended an olive branch. I offered amendments. But Democrats used the filibuster to block the debate from even happening. My friends across the aisle seemed to want the issue more than they wanted a solution. But I’m still working. I’m hopeful that this will be different,” he said.

Scott continued, “When America comes together, we’ve made tremendous progress. But powerful forces want to pull us apart. A hundred years ago, kids in classrooms were taught the color of their skin was their most important characteristic. And if they looked a certain way, they were inferior.

“Today, kids again are being taught that the color of their skin defines them, and if they look a certain way, they’re an oppressor. From colleges to corporations to our culture, people are making money and gaining power by pretending we haven’t made any progress at all, by doubling down on the divisions we’ve worked so hard to heal,” he said.

“You know this stuff is wrong. Hear me clearly: America is not a racist country. It’s backwards to fight discrimination with different types of discrimination. And it’s wrong to try to use our painful past to dishonestly shut down debates in the present.”

Scott said injecting race into every issue is wrong.

“Race is not a political weapon to settle every issue the way one side wants. It’s far too important,” he said.

“Our best future won’t come from Washington schemes or socialist dreams. It will come from you, the American people. Black, Hispanic, white and Asian. Republican and Democrat. Brave police officers and black neighborhoods.

“We are not adversaries. We are family. We are all in this together.

“And we get to live in the greatest country on Earth. The country where my grandfather, in his 94 years, saw his family go from cotton to Congress in one lifetime. So I am more than hopeful — I am confident — that our finest hour has yet to come. Original sin is never the end of the story. Not in our souls, and not for our nation. The real story is always redemption,” Scott said.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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