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Good Samaritans Help Officers Rescue Woman after Car Flips and Plunges into Delaware River

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When a car ended up flipped in the Delaware River on Thursday afternoon, it was all hands on deck for the rescue, with both police and bystanders responding to the incident.

Around 1:00 p.m., a car ran through the metal barrier on Freedom Pier in Gloucester City, New Jersey. It turned upside-down and hit the water, sinking.

“Detective Sergeant Carlos Depoder, Officer Sean Gartland, and Officer John Bryszewski Jr. jumped into the Delaware River and extricated a female from the vehicle,” the Gloucester City Police Department shared in a media release on its Facebook page.

The officers continued to tread water after removing the woman from the car, and one of them started giving her CPR while they were still in the water.

“They definitely jumped in at their own peril,” Lt. J. Flood with the Gloucester City Police told KYW-TV. “There are strong currents in the Delaware River.”

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Boaters in the area swooped in to pick up the officers and the woman and transport them to a nearby floating dock.

The woman was taken to a hospital and an investigation into the cause of the accident was underway. Divers searched the area to ensure there were no other people involved in the accident.

“It’s definitely an ongoing investigation, we still have to speak to witnesses, gain more information before we can speculate on what happened,” Flood told KYW-TV.



Later, the police department wanted to recognize the good Samaritans who assisted with the rescue.

Stratis Tiniakos helped the officers and woman get on the boat, then took them to the dock. Michael Natrin, who is also a firefighter and EMT, stepped in to help with CPR.

William Evans took officers in the back of his pickup truck so they could get home to shower and change.

And Gene Blemings also helped get the woman to safety during the commotion — but insists he’s no hero.

“That’s the way I was raised,” Blemings told KYW-TV. “You know, if someone needs help, that’s what you do.

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“I’m glad we were there, but as a hero? No. The cops — they were the heroes right there. They were exhausted, they were treading water and going above and beyond for her.



“They were in the water for a good 10 minutes and they worked hard … They had just brought her up out of the car and they, they were holding her pretty much on their bodies while they were floating giving her chest compressions.”

Blemings also said that the woman had regained consciousness, but there are no further updates on her condition.

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Amanda holds an MA in Rhetoric and TESOL from Cal Poly Pomona. After teaching composition and logic for several years, she's strayed into writing full-time and especially enjoys animal-related topics.
As of January 2019, Amanda has written over 1,000 stories for The Western Journal but doesn't really know how. Graduating from California State Polytechnic University with a MA in Rhetoric/Composition and TESOL, she wrote her thesis about metacognitive development and the skill transfer between reading and writing in freshman students.
She has a slew of interests that keep her busy, including trying out new recipes, enjoying nature, discussing ridiculous topics, reading, drawing, people watching, developing curriculum, and writing bios. Sometimes she has red hair, sometimes she has brown hair, sometimes she's had teal hair.
With a book on productive communication strategies in the works, Amanda is also writing and illustrating some children's books with her husband, Edward.
Location
Austin, Texas
Languages Spoken
English und ein bißchen Deutsch
Topics of Expertise
Faith, Animals, Cooking




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