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Hungary's PM Orban Elected to 4 More Years: Victory Over 'International Left, Soros Empire, Mainstream Media'

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Unapologetic nationalist Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban won what appeared to be a smashing victory Sunday in his quest for a fourth term.

“This victory will be remembered for the rest of our lives because so many people ganged up on us,” Orban said Sunday night, according to Hungary Today.

He listed as his enemies, “the left at home, the international left all around, the Brussels bureaucrats, the Soros empire with all its money, the international mainstream media, and in the end, even the Ukrainian president,” according to Breitbart.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has claimed Orban was too close to Russian leader Vladimir Putin, a relationship Orban has qualified as a pragmatic step for the betterment of his nation.

Orban mocked billionaire George Soros, saying that “every cent they gave to the Hungarian left was wasted money,” referring to support for his rivals.

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“The Hungarian left was the worst investment in ‘Uncle Gyuri’s life,’” he said, using a nickname for Soros, who was born in Hungary.

“We have won a victory so great that it can be seen from the moon, but certainly from Brussels,” Orban said, referring to the headquarters of the European Union, with which Orban has regularly battled.

“Christian Democratic national politics has won, and we should tell Brussels that this is not the past, but the future,” he said.

With around 91 percent of votes tallied, Orban’s Fidesz party-led coalition had about 53 percent of the vote. United for Hungary, a left-wing coalition, had about 34 percent of the vote, according to The Associated Press.

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The right-wing party Our Homeland Movement appeared as of Sunday to have gained 6 percent of the vote, meaning it has crossed Hungary’s threshold to get seats in parliament.

State secretary Zoltan Kovacs said the bevy of parties in the election was proof that democracy thrives in his country.

“We have heard a lot of nonsense recently about whether there is democracy in Hungary,” Kovacs said. “Hungarian democracy in the last 12 years has not weakened, but been strengthened.”

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Orban has taken on immigration advocates and what he called “EU bureaucrats” while standing up for traditional marriage.

“We insist marriage in Hungary is between a man and a woman, a father is a man and a mother is a woman … and they should leave our children alone,” he said in a November speech, according to Reuters.

In June, the Fidesz-led legislature passed a law “banning the use of materials seen as promoting homosexuality and gender change at schools, citing the need to protect children,” the report said.

This election featured six main parties working in unison against Orban, to no avail.

“The whole world has seen tonight in Budapest that Christian democratic politics, conservative civic politics and patriotic politics have won,” he said Sunday night, according to the AP. “We are telling Europe that this is not the past, this is the future.”

“One has to ask the Good Lord how it can be that we had the best victory when everyone was lined up against us. This victory means that regardless of tactics and guile, the heart always wins in the end. We won because we have a common passion: Hungary,” Orban said, according to Hungary Today.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
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Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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