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Hurricane Dorian Reportedly Becomes Deadly as Young Boy Is Killed

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A young boy became the first victim of Hurricane Dorian when the storm devastated parts of the Bahamas on Sunday.

Lachino Mcintosh, whose age was given as 7 or 8 in different reports, drowned Sunday after his family tried to run from the storm and find shelter, WBFS-TV in Miami reported.

His sister was reported missing, according to a tweet from the Bahamas Press.

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Ingrid McIntosh, the boy’s grandmother, said her daughter found her grandson’s body, CNN reported.

“I just saw my grandson about two days ago,” McIntosh said. “He told me he loved me. He was going back to Abaco, he turned around and said, ‘Grandma, I love you.'”

The Bahamas Press sought to report the extent of the damage on its website Monday.

“Marsh Harbour, Murphy Town, and Dundas Town Abaco are all reporting mass devastation — Communities destroyed and citizens left homeless,” it wrote.

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“The place is a disaster, no business is operable and bodies are floating around Big Cat,” the Press reported that its staff said, in contrast to official statements that said other than the one death, no one had been reported dead when the hurricane ripped into the island of Abaco. “The concern is nobody knows how many people died, and they feel when the water subsides some bodies will be washed out to sea.”

“There’s damages everywhere around my area,” Vernal Cooper said, according to CNN. “Cars and houses destroyed. This is what’s left of Marsh Harbour.”

Some shared images of destruction on Twitter.

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“My guy at St. Francis Church said there is no drinking water,” Louby Georges, director of international affairs for Human Rights Bahamas, said by phone from Nassau, the capital of the nation made up of small islands, according to The New York Times. “There are no trained emergency personnel with them.”

He had said that panic preceded the approach of the storm.

“People are sending voice notes, people are crying,” he said. “You can hear people hollering in the background.”

Experts said Monday could prove even worse, according to The Washington Post.

The storm was expected to hover for several hours over Grand Bahama Island, packing gusts that might near 200 mph and storm surge flooding that could send waves crashing 18 to 23 feet above normal.

The storm’s East Coast landfall is uncertain, with experts posting warnings from Florida to the Carolinas.

“We are facing a hurricane that we have never seen in The Bahamas,” Prime Minister Hubert Minnis tweeted.  “Please pray for us.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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