Share
News

Korean War Vet Sings Trump's Praises as Remains of Fallen Brothers Are Finally Returned Home

Share

To one Korean War veteran, President Donald Trump is “the second father of our country” for the deal Trump struck to bring home the remains of Americans killed in the Korean War.

Last week, 55 boxes containing remains were brought to Hawaii for the long process of identification. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had promised Trump North Korea would turn over the remains.

“This is a great first step in terms of bringing a bunch of fallen Americans home,” said Rear Admiral Jon Kreitz, the deputy director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, according to CNN.

Vice President Mike Pence was on hand to greet the remains when they arrived.

Some have called the Korean War the “forgotten war.” But today, we prove these heroes were never forgotten. Today, our boys are coming home,” Pence said, according to Real Clear Politics.

Trending:
Olympic Athlete Reveals Chilling Side Effect of COVID Booster Shot

The spectacle of the remains of dead Americans returning home was a moving one for Samuel Fielder, a Korean War veteran who was interviewed by The Daily Caller.

President Trump has done a great honor for this country,” Fielder said.

“He has fought for us, and he’s got these prisoners coming home, and all the people in the United States should be cheering and thanking him for it, not knocking him for it,” he said. Fielder blamed the media for dividing America.

Do you share this veteran's praise of the president?

“The media is trying with now all this propaganda to turn people against Trump. That’s what they’re trying to do,” he said.

Growing up during World War II “patriotism was the only thing,” Fielder said.

He contrasted that with the America of today.

“I think if we got in a war in this country half of them would be on the other side, and that’s exactly how I feel,” he said.

Fielder recalled combat in Korea.

Related:
Super Bowl Champs Team Up Against Corrupt DC Establishment: Burgess Owens Endorses Bequette for Senate

“I never saw any hand-to-hand combat, I saw artillery combat. They could hit us with their shells, we could hit them. But most of our firing in Korea was to protect the infantry,” he said, recalling attacks by “such a mass of people coming and some would still get through.”

Fielder said that he served with a man whose twin brother had been a North Korean prisoner of war who died in captivity. The veteran recently died, Fielder said.

“All his life he searched, and it just makes me feel bad that he’s not here to see this,” Fielder said, referring to the return of American remains.

During the interview, Fielder was asked what he would say to Trump if he ever had the chance to speak to the president. He replied that he had a “little rhyme” he wanted to share.

“Sixteen hundred and twenty, Christ was brought across the sea;

“Shook the Pilgrims’ noble hands and formed our destiny;

“Then Obama came along to take away our liberty;

“Then Trump came marching in, glory glory Hallelujah!” Fielder said.

Fielder also shared a poem about the Korean conflict that ended this way:

“And when to Heaven we will go, to Saint Peter we will tell; Just another forgotten warrior sir, I served my hitch in Hell.”

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, ,
Share
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




Conversation

The Western Journal is pleased to bring back comments to our articles! Due to threatened de-monetization by Big Tech, we had temporarily removed comments, but we have now implemented a solution to bring back the conversation that Big Tech doesn't want you to have. If you have any problems using the new commenting platform, please contact customer support at commenting-help@insticator.com. Welcome back!