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LA Police Official Shreds Gov. Newsom for Denying the Truth About Crime: He's Living in a 'Fantasy World'

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Los Angeles Police Protective League Vice President Sgt. Jerretta Sandoz blasted California Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday for living in a “fantasy world” in his announcement on crime in the state.

“There are some people that say some of the policies championed by Democrats [in California] … are making crime worse. What do you say to that?” a reporter asked Newsom Wednesday.

“The evidence doesn’t back it up,” the governor responded. “The last three decades we’ve actually seen a significant decline of crime in the state.”

When asked Friday on Fox News if she agreed with Newsom, Sandoz replied “Absolutely not … That’s a fantasy world. What world are we living in? I mean, you could look at the numbers throughout California and the rest of the country.”

“Crime is increasing. It is surging, and there’s no consequences,” she added.

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Sandoz also addressed the lack of law enforcement in parts of the Golden State.

“[T]here’s no repercussions for these criminals that feel that they could go in and do what they want. And it’s because of these laws. So no that statement is not true. The numbers don’t lie,” she said.

Jessica Millan Patterson, chair of the California Republican Party, agreed.

Should Gavin Newsom admit California's increased crime level?

“Instead of putting forward solutions, Newsom prioritized releasing violent criminals from prison while Democrat-run cities slashed police funding,” she said, according to The Sacramento Bee.

“Now with a recall looming, he claims it’s time to get serious. Voters can see through his photo ops and on Sept. 14 will replace him with a leader who is committed to returning safety to our communities.”

“Among the most basic needs for all Californians is to feel safe at home, at the park, or walking to school,” Newsom also announced during remarks on Wednesday.

“As we pursue nation-leading criminal justice reforms — all with an eye to making our communities safer — a more holistic approach is called for. We must invest in public safety while, at the same time, tackling the root causes of these increases.”

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“Prior to the pandemic, both California’s violent crime rates and property rates were among the lowest ever recorded,” a news release from the governor on Wednesday stated.

“Although crime rates have remained relatively steady, the latest data shows that we have experienced an increase in homicides and gun-related violence, mirroring a similar national trend.”

In addition to problems with crime, Newsom also faces a pending recall election in September.

The California Secretary of State’s office confirmed in June that the recall effort met the legal requirement of 1.5 million signatures on a petition calling for Newsom to be removed.

Only 43 of the more than 1.7 million signatures added to the petition were withdrawn, with the final count exceeding the amount needed to trigger a recall election, according to Fox News.

The election will ask voters to decide whether Newsom should remain governor of the state. Those who select “No” will be asked to choose a new governor from a list of candidates on the ballot as his replacement.

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Dillon Burroughs reports on breaking news for The Western Journal and is the author or co-author of numerous books.
Dillon Burroughs reports on breaking news for The Western Journal and is the author or co-author of numerous books. He holds degrees in communications and religion, and serves as co-host of the nationally syndicated radio program “A View from the Wall.” An accomplished endurance athlete, Burroughs has also completed numerous ultramarathons. He lives in Tennessee with his wife and three children.




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