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Media Mocked Trump for 'Rocky' Pic, Now It's a Symbol of Freedom in Hong Kong

Combined Shape

In Hong Kong, the winner is Trump by a knockout.

An image of President Donald Trump’s face on the body of iconic movie hero Rocky Balboa appears to have become a symbol for pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong, and was part of massive Thanksgiving Day protests in the city, which has been roiled by demonstrations since June.

The story began on a Rocky-esque note Wednesday, as Trump tweeted a picture of his head superimposed on Balboa, played by actor Sylvester Stallone.

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Although ESPN had previously noted the date as the 34th anniversary of the release of “Rocky IV,” no text accompanied Trump’s tweet, which was lampooned by some:

“Trump had the internet scratching its collective head,” Variety reported.

People, meanwhile, called the image “bizarre.”

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But that was before Trump hit China with a one-two punch, as noted by the New York Post.

On Wednesday afternoon, Trump signed two bills aimed toward fighting abuses of human rights in Hong Kong. The laws would sanction Chinese and Hong Kong officials who violate human rights, put Hong Kong’s trade status under an annual review and ban the export of certain weapons to Hong Kong police.

Do the Hong Kong protesters understand more about freedom than the U.S. media?

The effect in Hong Kong was electric.

“Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong,” thousands of protesters chanted Thursday.

Many of them were holding up copies of the Rocky image Trump had posted. Others were waving American flags.

They also sang “The Star-Spangled Banner,” according to The Washington Post.

Trump’s move spurred diplomatic sparring.

Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng called Trump’s punches a “serious interference in China’s internal affairs and a serious violation of international law,” a ministry statement said.

He accused Trump of a “nakedly hegemonic act.”

The U.S. Embassy said the Chinese government “must honor its promises to the Hong Kong people.”

Trump issued a statement when he signed the bills that read, “I signed these bills out of respect for President Xi, China, and the people of Hong Kong. They are being enacted in the hope that Leaders and Representatives of China and Hong Kong will be able to amicably settle their differences leading to long term peace and prosperity for all.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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