Share
Sports

NASCAR Fans Rebel Against Confederate Flag Ban

Share

Even though the Confederate battle flag was banned within Talledega Speedway on Sunday, outside the track, the initials “PC” stood for “publicly Confederate.”

Earlier this month, NASCAR said the Confederate flag no longer will be allowed at its events.

“The presence of the Confederate flag at NASCAR events runs contrary to our commitment to providing a welcoming and inclusive environment for all fans, our competitors and our industry,” NASCAR said in a statement posted on its website.

“Bringing people together around a love for racing and the community that it creates is what makes our fans and sport special. The display of the Confederate flag will be prohibited from all NASCAR events and properties,” it said.

At the time, NASCAR was racing without fans. On Sunday, Talledega was scheduled to be opened for a limited number of fans for the Geico 500, but rain postponed the event. Cars were set to take to the track Monday afternoon.

Trending:
'Holiday Nightmare Comes True' When Man Makes Strange Discovery in a Ravine on His Property

Although none of the fans seemed willing to test NASCAR’s rules within the speedway, many let their feelings be known outside.

A two-mile caravan of Confederate flag-bearing vehicles drove past Talladega in protest, according to The New York Times.

“The idea is to do it when people are trying to get in the gate,” said Johnny Wilson, 47, who drove a pickup sporting two Confederate flags.

Do you agree with NASCAR's decision to ban Confederate flags?

He said NASCAR was thinking of its image, not its fans.

“With everything going on in the world, they’re just trying to get attention for themselves,” he said.

Related:
FBI Reveals Harmless Truth About 'Noose' in Bubba Wallace's Garage

There was a limit to his protest, though.

“I’m going to respect what NASCAR says because I’m a race fan,” Wilson said after putting his flags away to enter the track.

One opinion was visible from inside the stadium: A plane towed a banner of a Confederate flag and the message “Defund NASCAR.”

Some decried NASCAR’s changes.

“They’re running off all the rednecks,” said Becky McDonald, 70, who owns the Mr. Hot Dog stand near the track and has operated it for 30 years.

“It ain’t like it used to be — all the wild children grew up,” she told The Times. “They made the statement, ‘We don’t need the rednecks anymore.’ Well, do you remember who got you here?”

Robert Castello, 68, who owns the nearby Dixie General Store, was doing a brisk business in Confederate flag items.

“People are pushing back,” he said.

“NASCAR’s decline started long before this,” Castello said. “It started when they tried to expand up north and turn it into an international sport. It’s not. It’s Southern.”

Ed Sugg was also doing a good business in rebel flags at his merchandise tent, according to ESPN.

“People are disappointed that NASCAR has taken that stance,” he said. “It’s been around for as long as all of us have been.

“I don’t think anybody really connects it to any kind of racism or anything. It’s just a Southern thing. It’s transparent. It’s just a heritage thing.”

CORRECTION, June 24, 2020: An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to the Confederate battle flag as the “Stars and Bars,” which is the nickname for the first official national flag of the Confederacy.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , ,
Share
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




Conversation

Notice: Due to threatened de-monetization, we have temporarily removed commenting while we build a long-term commenting solution that allows you to voice your opinion freely and allows us to continue to publish the news fearlessly and cover topics that you care about. If you would like to personally partner with The Western Journal to help us continue publishing while under relentless assault by Big Tech, please visit our subscription page here. We encourage you to share this article and discuss with your friends.