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NFL Star Hits NY with Common Sense: 'I Would Love to Go to a State That Doesn't Take Half My Money'

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A soon-to-be NFL free agent is sending a strong message to the state of New York by hitting its liberal leaders with some common sense.

On Monday, Jordan Poyer, a Pro Bowl safety for the Buffalo Bills, spoke on his podcast about the next step in his career.

When addressing the question of where he might decide to move in free agency, Poyer had some pretty direct things to say about his team’s home state.

“I would love to go to a state that doesn’t take half my money,” he said on “The Jordan Poyer Podcast,” referring to the fact that deep-blue New York has one of the highest tax burdens in the nation.

“It’s crazy to me how taxes work,” Poyer continued.

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He then addressed the fact that some people think big-time professional athletes should be able to make more than enough money to live wherever they want.

“Taxes play a big part in all of our lives, especially at the level that we play at,” the 31-year-old safety said.

“You know,” he said, “you look at some of your checks, and some places you go take half of your check away, and you’re wondering, ‘Where is that money even going? What are they doing with that money?'”


https://youtu.be/vnrL53280ws?t=53
Do you think there should be more transparency as to where your tax dollars are going?

In short, as Poyer noted, even professional athletes are impacted by the high taxes of states like New York, and in fact, because of the money they make, the state demands even more from their paychecks.

If a highly paid professional athlete thinks he cannot afford to stay in a blue state because of high taxes, imagine how ordinary working people must feel.

A survey by the Tax Foundation last year found that “New Yorkers faced the highest burden, with 15.9 percent of net product in the state going to state and local taxes.”

New York is not the only state that has to deal with this issue, as California has become notorious in recent years for its astronomically high taxes (fifth-highest, according to the Tax Foundation) and cost of living. That has made living in the Golden State unaffordable for many people and businesses, who have decided to abandon the state in search of greener pastures.

So, if Poyer is upset about the tax burden of New York, where might he relocate?

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Fortunately, there are several red states that have a lower cost of living and NFL teams.

Florida immediately springs to mind, as it has no state income tax and plenty of nice weather, which is fitting because the Bills safety said “it would be nice to see the sun” if he doesn’t stay in Buffalo.

Also, thanks to the leadership of Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, Florida has escaped from many of the other crazy leftist policies that have made states like New York unpleasant places to live. That explains why more than 64,000 New Yorkers moved to the Sunshine State last year, according to the New York Post.

Poyer would have options if he wants to play in Florida. The state is home to three NFL teams: the Miami Dolphins, Jacksonville Jaguars and Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Another possible destination for him is Texas, the low-tax home of the Dallas Cowboys and Houston Texas.

The good news is, as a free agent, Poyer will have the opportunity to move just about anywhere he wants — and away from the tax hell he’s experienced over his six seasons in Buffalo.

New York should take heed.

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Peter Partoll is a commentary writer for the Western Journal and a Research Assistant for the Catholic Herald. He earned his bachelor's degree at Hillsdale College and recently finished up his masters degree at Royal Holloway University of London. You can follow him on Twitter at @p_partoll.




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