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OSHA Will Not Make Employers Record Worker Side Effects from Forced COVID Vaccine

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When it comes to science and medicine, transparency is everything.

Scientific discourse requires all parties to be informed, and dissenting opinions, even if they are in the minority, need to be heard.

In medicine, how can people make the right decision for themselves if they aren’t given all of the relevant information?

According to the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, transparency apparently is not important in either of these areas.

In fact, OSHA believes that transparency and telling the truth are a hindrance to the common good.

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While the agency has issued guidance requiring employers to “record and report COVID-19 infections and deaths,” it said it will not require those same employers to “record worker side effects from COVID-19 vaccination” through May 2022.

OSHA’s reasoning? Reporting on vaccine side effects might discourage or disincentivize employers’ efforts to vaccinate their workers.

“OSHA does not want to give any suggestion of discouraging workers from receiving COVID-19 vaccination or to disincentivize employers’ vaccination efforts,” the agency’s website says on a 6,400-word page titled “Protecting Workers: Guidance on Mitigating and Preventing the Spread of COVID-19 in the Workplace.”

“As a result, OSHA will not enforce 29 CFR part 1904’s recording requirements to require any employers to record worker side effects from COVID-19 vaccination at least through May 2022,” it says.

Should employers be required to report workers' side effects from the vaccine?

This is disturbing news, but not because the COVID-19 vaccines pose any sort of existential threat.

Evidence shows COVID-19 side effects to be rather minimal, even more so than the effects of the virus itself.

Also, while the number of breakthrough infections is skyrocketing, showing the vaccine’s effectiveness might not be quite what the American people were promised, there’s no denying that the chance of dying from the coronavirus is greatly reduced by taking the vaccine.

With all of that being said, the vaccine does come with some side effects, as rare as they may be.

For individuals at extremely low risk of having an adverse reaction to COVID-19 — those who are young, physically fit and have no pre-existing conditions — it remains unclear as to whether the vaccines side effects are more or less of a threat than COVID-19 itself.

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Even if this were not the case, individuals should be given the freedom to decide what or what not to put into their bodies.

And in order to make that decision, each and every one of us needs the full truth about COVID and the COVID vaccines.

It isn’t up to “experts” and the elites to decide which truths the American people are allowed to hear.

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Michael wrote for a number of entertainment news outlets before joining The Western Journal in 2020 as a staff reporter. He now manages the writing and reporting teams, overseeing the production of commentary, news and original reporting content.
Michael Austin graduated from Iowa State University in 2019. During his time in college, Michael volunteered as a social media influencer for both PragerU and Live Action. After graduation, he went on to work as a freelance journalist for various entertainment news sites before joining The Western Journal in 2020 as a staff reporter.

Since then, Michael has been promoted to the role of Manager of Writing and Reporting. His responsibilities now include managing and directing the production of commentary, news and original reporting content.
Birthplace
Ames, Iowa
Nationality
American
Education
Iowa State University
Topics of Expertise
Culture, Faith, Politics, Education, Entertainment




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