Share
News

'Quit Answering My Phone': Rittenhouse's Lawyer 'Can't Count' Number of Death Threats He's Received

Share

Mark Richards, Kyle Rittenhouse’s criminal defense attorney, has been inundated with so many death threats that he has been forced to use his wife’s cellphone.

A Wisconsin jury on Friday found Rittenhouse, 18, not guilty in the fatal shooting of two men during protests in Kenosha last year, bringing to an end a high-profile, two-week trial that saw the intersection of self-defense, gun rights and race all in one case.

The protests took place in the aftermath of the shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man, by a white Kenosha police officer.

Richards, 59, told the Insider he “can’t count” the number of threats against his life related to the case. “It’s too high,” he said.

“By the time I left the courthouse yesterday and started answering my phone, the first three calls were death threats, and I just quit answering my phone,” Richards said.

Trending:
'Holiday Nightmare Comes True' When Man Makes Strange Discovery in a Ravine on His Property

In fact, such calls began around three weeks ago, with Richards thinking he could “fluff off” the threats, which have only increased since his client’s acquittal.

No method of communication seems safe from the intimidating tactics adopted by some people unhappy with the jury’s decision.

“I’m going through my emails,” he said. “There are threatening emails, too.”

Even shifting to using his wife’s cellphone has seen only limited success in avoiding death threats, which have also come in on her device.

Did the jury make the correct decision in finding Kyle Rittenhouse not guilty on all charges?

“I would love for things to change, for people to talk to one another without fighting, but, unfortunately, I don’t see it changing any time soon,” he said.

Richards insists he had no political agenda in taking on Rittenhouse as a client, that his only goal was defending Rittenhouse.

“I was hired by the two first lawyers. I’m not going to use their names,” Richards told reporters on Friday, according to the Daily Mail. “They wanted to use Kyle for a cause and something that I think was inappropriate — and I don’t represent causes. I represent clients.”

The only thing that mattered, Richardson told the outlet, was “whether he [Rittenhouse] was found guilty or not.”

Rittenhouse was found not guilty of first-degree intentional homicide and four other felony charges.

Related:
Bill to Award Kyle Rittenhouse a Congressional Gold Medal Introduced in House

Throughout the trial, Rittenhouse maintained he acted in self-defense in shooting three men — two of them fatally — who attacked him, including the sole survivor, who admitted in court to pointing a handgun at Rittenhouse before the then-17-year-old shot him in the right arm with his AR-15.

Rittenhouse shot and killed Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, after the latter chased the teen and attempted to grab his firearm.

Rittenhouse then ran away toward a police line, at which point he was chased by several other men, including Anthony Huber, 26, who struck him with a skateboard.

Rittenhouse shot Huber, killing him, before shooting and injuring Gaige Grosskreutz, 26 at the time, who was holding a pistol.

Rittenhouse faced life in prison had he been convicted on the most serious charge.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , ,
Share
Brett Davis, who earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Western Washington University, has written for newspapers, public policy organizations, a major humanitarian institution and a software company. Brett lives in Federal Way, Washington, just south of Seattle.
Brett Davis, who earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Western Washington University, has written for newspapers, public policy organizations, a major humanitarian institution and a software company. Brett lives in Federal Way, Washington, just south of Seattle.




Conversation

Notice: Due to threatened de-monetization, we have temporarily removed commenting while we build a long-term commenting solution that allows you to voice your opinion freely and allows us to continue to publish the news fearlessly and cover topics that you care about. If you would like to personally partner with The Western Journal to help us continue publishing while under relentless assault by Big Tech, please visit our subscription page here. We encourage you to share this article and discuss with your friends.