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Watch: Steve Harvey Can't Understand Single Word Out of Adorable Scottish Boy's Mouth

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Steve Harvey is a widely recognized actor and host who’s hosted in hits like “Family Feud” and “Little Big Shots.” He’s known for his humor, quick wit and hilarious reactions.

“Little Big Shots” has become especially popular because it showcases gregarious tots with talent and a flair for the spotlight. You never know what a kid’s going to say, which makes the show quite entertaining. It’s similar, in that respect, to classics like “Kids Say the Darndest Things.”



During one episode, Harvey spoke to a young man who hailed from Scotland. Oscar, the 6-year-old boy, has an accent that charmed most listeners — and perplexed Harvey.

This particular clip opens to Harvey asking if Oscar has a favorite subject in school. The boy immediately answers, but Harvey just stares at him.

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“I like the fesh. So good.”

“You like the what?” the host queries.

“Fesh,” Oscar repeats. To clarify, he widens his eyes and runs his tongue over his lips and says “mm.”

That was going nowhere, so the tot decided to explain further. “See like fesh in the sea,” he urged.

Harvey got it. To be fair, “fish” is not a school subject, so no wonder Harvey wasn’t tracking. “I don’t… I don’t understand how fish got in this conversation,” the host admitted. “I’m trying to tie the two together.”

He works out that the young lad means he enjoys the fish-based meals he gets from the school. But after Oscar says “fesh” one too many times, Harvey backs him up and tries to iron out the pronunciation.

Of course, Oscar is convinced he’s got the vowel sound right, and tries to correct Harvey, and Harvey retorts with “You don’t teach me!,” much to the crowd’s amusement.

Once they agree to disagree, Harvey goes back to the topic at hand, asking what kind of fish the boy likes. The boy’s mother explains that he likes fish and chips, which Harvey translates to french fries.

“Deeefinitely!” Oscar agrees.

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Next they move onto some Scottish words. The problem is that Harvey’s the one reading them out loud, and, well, he’s not Scottish, so there’s a bit of misunderstanding.

The first word is “boggin,” which is slang for dirty, filthy or disgusting. But the way Harvey says it, the word sounds like “boakin.”

“That means seck,” Oscar offers. Harvey leans in and stares at him. “Seck,” the boy repeats. He pantomimes throwing up and Harvey understands, but goes right back to clarifying vowels.

“Boggin isn’t sick boggin means ‘dirty,'” commented a viewer by the name of Danny Phillips. “I think the wee man thought he said “boakin” which means being sick in Scotland but no denying the wee fella is a star.”

Harvey works over the first word in the next phrase a few times before Oscar rattles off a suggestion that the host can only reply “huh?” to. “That means going for a wee walk,” the chap confirmed.



Acting out the terms has worked out well, so Oscar hops up and walks alongside Harvey across the stage to illustrate the point, singing “goin for a walk” as they mosey along.

The last word is “cannae.” Oscar pipes up, “Ah, can’t do it.”

“I can’t do it either,” Harvey says in mock defeat.

“No!” laughs the boy, and his mom steps in to clarify that “can’t do it” is actually what the term means. They end the segment by showing off the 6-year-old’s Irish dance skills. He’s clearly very talented, even though it’s hard to see his footwork since he’s wearing black and is set against a black stage.

Even if his misunderstanding is feigned, Harvey’s a great host who can draw out the guests and keep the viewers entertained. Plus, this kid isn’t just well-spoken, he’s got some serious dance skills!

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