Path 27

Facebook steps up fight against vaccine misinformation

Path 27

NEW YORK (AP) — In a story March 7 about Facebook fighting vaccine information on its platform, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Facebook would remove groups and pages that spread misinformation about vaccinations. In fact, Facebook won’t remove those groups or pages; instead, they won’t appear in recommendations or predictions when searched for on the site.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Facebook steps up fight against vaccine misinformation

Social media giant Facebook says it is hiding groups and pages that spread misinformation about vaccinations from the search function of its site.

NEW YORK (AP) — Social media giant Facebook says it is hiding groups and pages that spread misinformation about vaccinations from the search function of its site.

Trending:
Gymnast Who Famously Won Gold for US on Injured Ankle Speaks Out on Simone Biles

It’s the latest step Facebook and others are taking to stem the tide of misinformation on social media sites.

Facebook said Thursday it will take its cue from global health organizations, such as the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which have publicly identified verifiable vaccine hoaxes.

If groups and pages spread those hoaxes, they won’t appear in recommendations or in predictions functions when searched for in Facebook. Ads with similar information will be rejected.

And content that contains the misinformation won’t be shown on Instagram Explore or hashtag pages.

Federal health officials have attributed a recent spike in the number of measles cases in part to misinformation that has made some parents shun the vaccine.

The bogus notion that vaccines cause autism — kicked off by a now disproven study from 1998 — didn’t start on social networks but has spread there. While overall vaccination rates remain high in the U.S. according to the Centers for Disease Control, the number of kids under two who haven’t received any vaccines is growing. The CDC attributes much of this to lack of health insurance — uninsured kids are much more likely to be unvaccinated than children who have health insurance.

Vaccination against a list of diseases is required to attend school in the U.S., but 17 states allow some type of non-medical exemption for “personal, moral or other beliefs,” according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Path 27
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




loading

Conversation