Terror attack gun supplier wants to withdraw guilty plea

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RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — The man who bought two rifles that terrorists used to kill 14 people in a 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino wants to withdraw his guilty plea.

Through his lawyer, Enrique Marquez told a federal judge Friday that he’ll withdraw his 2017 plea to providing material support to terrorists. Attorney John Aquilina says he’ll file the motion by May 13.

Aquilina won’t detail the reason for the decision, which federal prosecutors are expected to challenge.

Marquez was facing a potential 25-year prison sentence.

Marquez bought the semi-automatic rifles used by Syed Rizwan Farook and Farook’s wife, Tashfeen Malik, in the attack on a Christmas party gathering of San Bernardino County employees. The couple later died in a police firefight.

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Prosecutors said Marquez knew Farook but wasn’t involved in the attack.

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