White House mum on if Trump really thinks Dems 'hate' Jews

Combined Shape

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House press secretary Sarah Sanders on Monday repeatedly refused to say whether President Donald Trump really thinks Democrats “hate” Jewish people.

Before Trump left the White House on Friday for his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, he said: “The Democrats have become an anti-Israel party. They’ve become an anti-Jewish party, and that’s too bad.” Later in the day, Trump told Republican National Committee donors that Democrats “hate” Jewish people, according to person who heard the remarks but spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the president’s comments at a private event.

Trump’s comments followed an emotional debate on Capitol Hill about statements made by freshman Rep. Ilhan Omar, a Muslim lawmaker from Minnesota who suggested Israel’s supporters were pushing lawmakers to take a pledge of “allegiance” to a foreign country — comments that some viewed as anti-Semitic.

Democrats wrestled for days over whether a House resolution should call Omar out by name, what other types of bias should be mentioned in the measure and whether the party would tolerate dissenting views on Israel. When the final resolution passed the House, it did not mention Omar by name. Trump called the resolution “disgraceful.”

Sanders refused several times to say whether Trump really thinks Democrats “hate” Jews.

Trending:
Trump Launches New Website to Replace Deleted Social Accounts, Mobilizes Fans to Retake Twitter

“The president has been an unwavering and committed ally to Israel and the Jewish people and, frankly, the remarks that have been made by a number of Democrats and failed to be called out by Democrat leadership is frankly abhorrent and it’s sad,” she said.

“It’s something that should be called by name. It shouldn’t be put in a watered-down resolution. It should be done the way the Republicans did it when Steve King made terrible comments,” Sanders said. “We called it out by name. We stripped him of his committee memberships and we’d like to see Democrats follow suit.”

In January, the House approved a Democratic measure disapproving of comments that Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, made about white supremacy. King had a long history of controversial rhetoric about immigrants, but it wasn’t until he defended white supremacy in an interview with The New York Times that Republicans in Congress moved to strip him of committee assignments and called for his resignation.

In August 2017, after violence erupted at a white nationalist “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, Trump said “both sides” were to blame, a comment some saw as a refusal to condemn racism.

“The president has been incredibly clear and has consistently and repeatedly condemned hatred, bigotry, racism in all of its forms whether it’s in America or anywhere else,” Sanders said Monday.

___

Associated Press writer Zeke Miller contributed to this report.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation