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Facebook Removes Capitol Attacker's Profile, Purges References to Nation of Islam, Farrakhan

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As Americans grappled for a motive behind Friday’s deadly attack that killed a Capitol Police officer, Facebook locked everything attacker Noah Green had posted on Facebook and Instagram behind a wall of policy.

Green, 25, was killed by a Capitol Policer after he rammed two officers with his car outside the Capitol building perimeter in Washington, killing Officer William Evans.

A second officer was wounded.

“After this horrific event, our thoughts are with the Capitol Police and their loved ones. We have designated the incident under our Dangerous Individuals and Organizations policy, which means we have removed the suspect’s accounts from Facebook and Instagram, and are removing any content that praises, supports, or represents the attack or the suspect. We are in contact with law enforcement as they conduct their investigation,” Facebook said in a statement, according to The Hill.

After last month’s mass shooting in Boulder, Colorado, by Ahmad Al Aliwi Alissa, a Syrian-born Muslim, Blair Miller, digital producer at KMGH-TV in Denver, provided a screenshot on Twitter of a Facebook announcement that the company had “removed accounts for the identified suspect from Facebook and Instagram” pursuant to its “Dangerous Individuals and Organizations policy.”

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That company-wide policy provides that the platform does not allow “individuals that … are engaged in violence to have a presence on Facebook.”

Despite Facebook’s action, significant chunks of Green’s latest communications survived.

CNN offered some tidbits from Green’s Instagram account, which included many links the showed Nation of Islam leader Minister Louis Farrakhan.

“The U.S. Government is the #1 enemy of Black people!” a caption on a video read, according to CNN.

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In another Instagram post, Green wrote that Farrakhan saved him “after the terrible afflictions I have suffered presumably by the CIA and FBI, government agencies of the United States of America,” CNN reported.

He also posted that “I have suffered multiple home break ins, food poisonings, assaults, unauthorized operations in the hospital, mind control,” according to CNN.

On Facebook, he wrote of life being hard, and also wrote about the powerful influence Farrakhan had had on him.

Should Facebook have left these posts for everyone to see?

“To be honest these past few years have been tough, and these past few months have been tougher,” Green wrote, CNN reported. “I have been tried with some of the biggest, unimaginable tests in my life.”

He wrote that he was unemployed “after I left my job partly due to afflictions, but ultimately, in search of a spiritual journey.”

“My faith is one of the only things that has been able to carry me through these times and my faith is centered on the belief of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan as Jesus, the Messiah, the final divine reminder in our midst,” the post continued, according to CNN. “I consider him my spiritual father. Without his guidance, his word, and his teachings that I’ve picked up on along the way, I would’ve been unable to continue.”

But one of his final messages was private and went to his brother, Brendan, according to The Washington Post.

Brendan Green said his brother was very sick Thursday evening, and sent him a text.

“‘I’m sorry but I’m just going to go and live and be homeless,’” Brendan Green said the text read, according to The Post. “Thank you for everything that you’ve done. I looked up to you when I was a kid. You inspired me a lot.”

The Post reported that Noah Green had alleged he was drugged with Xanax in 2019.

Brendan Green said his brother suffered hallucinations and suicidal thoughts, and suddenly abandoned an apartment he had in Newport News, Virginia, to move to Indianapolis. He told his brother then he was afraid of break-ins.

Noah Green’s “mind didn’t seem right,” his brother told The Post.

Brendan Green said his brother recently moved to Botswana and told him that “his mind was telling him to basically commit suicide.”

Two weeks ago Noah Green moved in with his brother, telling him he was “in a really bad situation and in really bad shape,” Brendan Green said, according to The Post.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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