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Homeowner Hears Missing Cat's Faint Cry Coming from Chimney, Had Likely Been Trapped for Days

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When you have a cat who spends time both inside and outdoors, you get used to the cat’s wandering adventure tendencies.

Outdoor cats are fiercely independent, hunting, exploring and soaking up sunny spots on their own timeframe.

But sometimes, cats get themselves into some pretty scary predicaments that they simply cannot escape on their own.

Marble the cat lives with her human owners, roommates Taylor Hazley and Tuesday West, in a Kansas City, Missouri, home.

The two women became concerned after they hadn’t seen Marble for several days. Then, Hazley heard a faint meow that left her feeling worried and helpless.

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Marble was stuck tight in the old chimney, sealed in by layer upon layer of thick brick and limestone.

The roommates called animal control and the fire department for help but were told the rescue operation would be too delicate and risky both for the cat and the structure of the home.

Hazley was worried sick at the thought of Marble’s fate, until a team of chimney cleaners came to the rescue.

When they heard about Marble’s predicament, Full Service Chimney put their day on hold to come over and rescue the poor animal.

“When we put our camera down, we were able to determine the length, and where that cat exactly was,” technician Chris Terrones told KCTV.

“My fear was that debris was going to fall on top of it, but after assessing the situation, we determined to go from the bottom up.”

Terrones and his crew spent hours carefully excavating their way into the chimney, creating a small hole large enough to free the frightened cat.

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With a little coaxing, a scared Marble allowed Hazley to reach inside and pull her out. The chimney team didn’t charge the roommates for the job, they just wanted to see a little family made whole once again.

“I had to put my dog down about two weeks ago, so I know what that means to have that animal,” Terrones said.

Hazley and West said they felt relief and gratitude for Marble’s kindhearted rescue team.

“We’re just extremely grateful that they took honestly, half of their day, to come and free our cat,” Hazley said.

“They did it out of the kindness of their hearts, and they’re not asking anything from us, and it’s truly remarkable.”

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A graduate of Grand Canyon University, Kim Davis has been writing for The Western Journal since 2015, focusing on lifestyle stories.
Kim Davis began writing for The Western Journal in 2015. Her primary topics cover family, faith, and women. She has experience as a copy editor for the online publication Thoughtful Women. Kim worked as an arts administrator for The Phoenix Symphony, writing music education curriculum and leading community engagement programs throughout the region. She holds a degree in music education from Grand Canyon University with a minor in eating tacos.
Birthplace
Page, Arizona
Education
Bachelor of Science in Music Education
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Lifestyle & Human Interest




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