Commentary

Male Heavyweight Walks Away from Women's Weightlifting Event with Multiple Gold Medals

Laurel Hubbard, a weightlifter who was born male as Gavin Hubbard, competed against females this past weekend.

Surprise, surprise: Hubbard won three medals.

The 41-year-old New Zealander medaled in the women’s field in three heavyweight divisions in the Pacific Games held in Samoa. The heavyweight division is for competitors who weigh more than 192 pounds.

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The second place medal went to an 18-year-old weightlifter named Feagaiga Stowers, who, according to The Caldron Pool, won the Samoan gold medal last year only after Hubbard was unable to compete due to an injury.

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Feagaiga Stowers was born Feagaiga Stowers.

Stowers is also Samoa’s flag bearer. As Mata’afa Keni Lesa wrote in the Samoa Observer, “this Pacific Games was supposed to have been her moment.”

Lesa wasn’t amused by Hubbard’s stealing the gold from Stowers. “[H]er kiwi competitor is someone who shouldn’t have been there in the first place,” Lesa writes. “Many of us know the story. Hubbard’s story is one of many cases, where political correctness has allowed a blatant wrong to be accepted.”

Lesa argues that Hubbard’s participation diminishes opportunities for hard-working biological females. “But where we have an issue, and where people in positions of power to right this wrong should act immediately, is when Hubbard denies the opportunity for women like Stowers to claim what is rightfully theirs,” Lesa wrote. “Hubbard does not belong in the women’s competition.”

Sports and competition are built on the idea that people compete against each other on a level playing field. To Lesa, allowing Hubbard into the female competition undermines that fundamental premise.

“We are talking about sports here. One of the values of sport is fairness,” Lesa argues. “We cannot say that allowing a transgender to compete against women is fair. It is grossly unfair for women like Stowers, or all women, for that matter.”

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Lesa knows that by merely bringing up Hubbard’s biological advantage over the other competitors, he will be labeled a bigot by the left. And he’s okay with that.

“In raising this issue, we accept people would call us names such as racist, discriminative, homophobic and what have you,” Lesa says. “We’re okay with that. Everyone is entitled to an opinion.”

“But here is the thing, we should insist on the truth. Besides, it is upon the decisions we make today we establish the foundation for tomorrow.”

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G.S. Hair is the former executive editor of The Western Journal.
G.S. Hair is the former executive editor of The Western Journal and vice president of digital content of Liftable Media.

After graduating law school from the Cecil C. Humphries School of Law, Mr. Hair spent a decade as an attorney practicing at the trial and appellate level in Arkansas and Tennessee. He represented clients in civil litigation, contractual disputes, criminal defense and domestic matters. He spent a significant amount of time representing indigent clients who could not afford private counsel in civil or criminal matters. A desire for justice and fairness was a driving force in Mr. Hair's philosophy of representation. Inspired by Christ’s role as an advocate on our behalf before God, he often represented clients who had no one else to fight on their behalf.

Mr. Hair has been a consultant for Republican political candidates and has crafted grassroots campaign strategies to help mobilize voters in staunchly Democrat regions of the Eastern United States.

In early 2015, he began writing for Conservative Tribune. After the site was acquired by Liftable Media, he shut down his law practice, moved to Arizona and transitioned into the position of site director. He then transitioned to vice president of content. In 2018, after Liftable Media folded all its brands into The Western Journal, he was named executive editor. His mission is to advance conservative principles and be a positive and truthful voice in the media.

He is married and has four children. He resides in Phoenix, Arizona.
Birthplace
South Carolina
Education
Homeschooled (and proud of it); B.A. Mississippi College; J.D. University Of Memphis
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Culture, Faith, Politics




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