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Sports

Nationals Player Rejects Claims Trump Shouldn't Attend World Series: 'He's the President of This Country'

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Controversy followed the World Series to Washington, D.C., after President Donald Trump said he would attend Game 5 of the series.

The underdog Washington Nationals begin what could be three consecutive home games Friday with a 2-0 series lead over the heavily favored Houston Astros in the best-of-seven series.

If Game 5 is necessary (i.e. if the Astros win one of the next two games), it would be played Sunday.

In the past, some athletes have distanced themselves from Trump over his political stances.

That might explain why Washington Nationals pitcher Anibal Sanchez was asked Thursday about whether it was appropriate for Trump to attend an upcoming game.

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“He’s the president of this country. If he wants to come to the game, it’s something that he wants to do. Of course everybody has to respect that situation,’’ Sanchez said when told some Hispanic players disagree with Trump’s policies, according to the New York Post.

“I don’t want to attack him like I got something against. I’m following the president, like you say, I’m from Venezuela. I’m out of this country, but then I respect all those situations,” he said.

Should Donald Trump attend a World Series game in Washington?

“And like I say, he’s the president, and if he want to come, why not?’’

During a White House ceremony Thursday, Trump was asked about attending a game while the series was in town.

A Washington team was last in the World Series in 1933.

Trump said he would attend, but not throw out a ceremonial first pitch, according to a White House transcript of his remarks

“I don’t know. They’re going to have to dress me up in a lot of heavy armor. I’ll look too heavy. I don’t like that,” he said.

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Trump’s comment immediately drew criticism. The New York Times noted that Trump would be appearing before a crowd of fans who largely voted against him in the 2016 election.

“He would do much better if he threw out a pitch in Houston,” former Republican Rep. Tom Davis of Virginia told The Times, referring to Trump’s political support in Texas.

“I think it only says something about Trump,” sniped Joe Lockhart, a former press secretary for former President Bill Clinton.

“He only enjoys events that are about him. He doesn’t enjoy or really recognize something that’s bigger than him.”

The ceremonial first pitch for Friday’s Game 3 will feature members of the Nationals team from 2005, according to The Washington Post.

The Nationals announced Friday that Game 4 will be opened by a player from the team’s youth baseball academy, joined by pitcher Max Scherzer and third baseman Anthony Rendon.

Game 5 will be opened by restaurant owner Jose Andres.

Andres pulled out of a partnership with the Trump Organization due to comments made by then-candidate Trump in 2015, NPR reported.

Presidents have often thrown out ceremonial first pitches at World Series games, beginning with Woodrow Wilson in 1915, according to CNN.

Since then, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower, Jimmy Carter and George W. Bush are among those who have done so.

Bush’s appearance came in Yankee Stadium only weeks after the 9/11 terror attacks.

“I had never had such an adrenaline rush as when I finally made it to the mound. I was saying to the crowd, ‘I’m with you, the country’s with you’ … and I wound up and fired the pitch,” Bush said later, according to MLB.com.

“I’ve been to conventions and rallies and speeches: I’ve never felt anything so powerful and emotions so strong, and the collective will of the crowd so evident.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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