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Pictures Show Harrowing 'Stadium Effect' of Hurricane Dorian

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A week ago, little-known Tropical Storm Dorian was churning across the Atlantic with maximum winds of 50 mph.

By Labor Day, it had become Hurricane Dorian, a monster breaking the record for the most powerful storm ever to make landfall in the Atlantic and the second-most powerful storm ever recorded.

At 8 a.m. ET Monday, the storm was about 120 miles east of West Palm Beach, Florida, with alerts posted from Florida through the Carolinas, according to the National Hurricane Center. Although forecasters spoke generally of the storm moving north or northwest, they cautioned that with hurricane-force winds extending 45 miles from its eye, the danger zone was wide and not narrow.

President Donald Trump on Monday retweeted the most recent projections for impacts to the Carolinas in an effect to encourage preparations.

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On Sunday, the storm slammed the Bahamas with win gusts that reached 220 mph. Although the storm hit the Bahamas with winds at 185 mph — second only to Hurricane Allen, which had winds of 190 mph — the hurricane had weakened slightly to 165 mph as of Monday morning.

However, the storm was moving a 1 mph, which meant forecasters expected it would linger over Grand Bahama for as long as nine hours, CNN reported.

Part of its power is linked to the destructive beauty of what is known as the “stadium effect,” in which the eye of the hurricane looks like the bowl of a stadium, with walls of clouds towering around the eye, Fox News reported.

The “stadium effect” takes place when the storm sucks in air, which moves outward and upward from the core.

Aerial images show the bowl-like center of Dorian.

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Despite its beauty from above, at ground level the storm brought death and destruction.

Ingrid McIntosh reported that her grandson was killed in the storm and her granddaughter is missing after the hurricane hit Abaco Island in the Bahamas

McIntosh said her daughter told her that she found the body of her son, who she believed drowned in the rising waters.

“All I can say is that my daughter called from Abaco and said that her son — my grandson — is dead. That’s it. I don’t know what really happened. I think she said he drowned,” McIntosh said.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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