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Prosecutor Announces Major Charges Against Parents of Michigan School Shooting Suspect

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The parents of a teen accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school were charged with involuntary manslaughter Friday as a prosecutor described chilling moments that day when a teacher found a drawing of a gun, a person bleeding and the words “blood everywhere” at the boy’s desk.

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said the parents committed “egregious” acts, including buying a gun and making it available to Ethan Crumbley and failing to intervene when they were summoned to Oxford High School on Tuesday and confronted with the drawing.

A teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

School officials told James and Jennifer Crumbley to get their 15-year-old into counseling, McDonald said.

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He was returned to class and later emerged from a bathroom with a gun, firing at students in the hallway, according to police.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

“These charges are intended to hold the individuals who contributed to this tragedy accountable and also send the message that gun owners have a responsibility,” McDonald said. “When they fail to uphold that responsibility, there are serious and criminal consequences.”

It wasn’t immediately known if the Crumbleys have lawyers who could comment on the involuntary manslaughter charges.

Under Michigan law, the charge can be pursued if prosecutors believe someone contributed to a situation where harm or death was high.

Ethan Crumbley has been charged as an adult with two dozen crimes, including murder, attempted murder and terrorism, in the shooting Tuesday at the Oakland County school, roughly 30 miles north of Detroit.

Four students were killed and seven more people were injured. Three were in hospitals in stable condition.

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Experts say parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house.

Sheriff Mike Bouchard disclosed Wednesday that the parents met with school officials about their son’s classroom behavior just a few hours before the shooting.

The superintendent for the district late Thursday posted a YouTube video where he said the teenager was called to the office before the shooting but “no discipline was warranted.”

Tim Throne, leader of Oxford Community Schools, said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. But he repeatedly credited students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

“To say that I am still in shock and numb is probably an understatement. These events that have occurred will not define us,” Throne, grim-faced and speaking slowly, said in the 12-minute video.



“I want you to know that there’s been a lot of talk about the student who was apprehended, that he was called up to the office and all that kind of stuff. No discipline was warranted,” he said. “There are no discipline records at the high school. Yes, this student did have contact with our front office, and, yes, his parents were on campus Nov. 30.”

Throne said he couldn’t immediately release additional details.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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