Parler Share

Thief takes Marilyn Monroe statue from Hollywood gazebo

Parler Share

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Goodbye, Norma Jean?

Officials say someone climbed a more than two-story tall Hollywood public art piece and stole a statue of Marilyn Monroe.

The statue depicting Monroe in her iconic pose from the 1955 film “The Seven Year Itch” went missing early Monday from the “Four Ladies of Hollywood” gazebo.

Los Angeles Councilman Mitch O’Farrell says a witness saw someone climb the gazebo on the Hollywood Walk Fame and saw off the statue.

Los Angeles police say investigators have recovered fingerprints from the gazebo.

Trending:
GOP Senator Stumps Biden's Judicial Nominee with Basic Questions About Constitution: 'How Do You Not Know This?'

The gazebo was erected in 1994. It pays tribute to women in film, with depictions of Dolores Del Rio, Dorothy Dandridge, Mae West and Anna May Wong making up the structure’s pillars.

Monroe, whose real name was Norma Jeane Mortenson, died in 1962.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Parler Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands. Photo credit: @AP on Twitter
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation