USGA, Justin Thomas to meet to talk rules changes

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — The USGA says it will meet with Justin Thomas in the coming days, in response to his criticisms over some of the game’s newest rules changes.

The world’s No. 3 player and the USGA engaged a bit over Twitter during the weekend, and then chatted offline as well. USGA senior managing director of championships John Bodenhamer says he has arranged a meeting with Thomas, one of many players who have expressed displeasure about the modernized Rules of Golf that took effect this year.

Bodenhamer told Golf Channel the USGA will renew its efforts to explain some of the rule tweaks to players. The Honda Classic this week provided a plethora of rules-related issues, from Thomas not being able to replace a bent club to Alex Cejka being disqualified for using an oversized greens-reading book.

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More AP golf: https://apnews.com/apf-Golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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