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Cali Citizens Must Now Face Looters with Weaker, State-Compliant Guns

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The situation in California is dire.

Drug needles and human waste litter the streets of major cities. Democratic leadership has been slowly chipping away at citizens’ rights. And for the past few years, restrictive environmental policies have set the state ablaze.

In northern California, the Camp Fire is responsible for at least 76 deaths, while the Woolsey fire in Southern California is responsible for at least three deaths, according to CBS. Together, the two huge fires have destroyed more than 13,000 structures. And now, communities ravaged by the fire are facing a new threat as reports of looting come in.

On Saturday, Ventura County Sheriff’s Sgt. Eric Buschow confirmed to the media that two suspected looters were already behind bars, and law enforcement officers were vigilantly looking for more.

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Understandably, some Californians are not taking their chances with dialing 911 when they see a looter.

Carey Hart, ex-motocross star and husband of celebrity pop singer Pink, seems to have the perfect solution for those looking to profit off the misfortune of others.

Is California going to pay a price for its gun control laws?

Although Hart and his wife live near the fires, there’s no information in his post about where the “P.D.C. Posse” is located.

Still, their weapons all appear to be California-compliant. With bans on assault weapons and magazines that hold over 10 rounds, the shotguns and hunting rifles in the photo are some of the few weapons the liberal state allows its citizens to own.

Thanks to the People’s Republic of California’s gun laws, this kind of underwhelming show of force appears to be the rule instead of the exception. But if they are Californians, the men in the picture might be considered lucky just to have firearms at all.

Those needing a firearm in the state quickly discover the regulations are not on their side. The state of California Department of Justice hosts a lengthy list of rules that shows how difficult it is to legally purchase a gun.

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Anyone trying to harden their defenses before the fires and ensuing looters swept through may have run afoul of a particularly nasty law: the 10-day waiting period. Fires, looters, and criminals don’t wait. Appeals to the state will likely fall on deaf ears, as the state’s website confirms exceptions to this rule exist but “don’t apply to the general public.”

Buying a gun from a friend is out of the picture, too. The same waiting period applies, and even person-to-person transactions must be done in a licensed firearm dealer.

Residents may also be shocked to find out about the strict identification laws while purchasing a gun. Even if a transaction is conducted between two family members, both will need accurate and up-to-date California ID cards.

Although the state requires strict documentation while conducting a firearm transaction, the same caution is not given to their elections. California’s Secretary of State says voters “are not required to show identification at their polling place.”

Democratic leadership has pushed California to the brink and all citizens have to show for it are wildfires, looters, and a crippling welfare state. A change in leadership is unlikely, but almost certainly necessary for California’s survival.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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