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Jordan Peterson Cuts Trans Individual Down to Size for Defeating Women in Weight Competition

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Imagine for a moment you’re a female weightlifter.

For years, you’ve started every day with a run. You spend grueling hours in the gym and live with the sore muscles as a testament to that. Your diet is just as strict and regimented as your workout routine — every calorie and macronutrient is accounted for, and you force yourself to drink protein shakes between every meal.

Feeling prepared and at the top of your game, you enter a state powerlifting competition. All of your hard work is about to pay off. After watching the women competing, you’re sure that first place is yours.

But after the women’s division winners are announced, a 280-pound man walks up. The judges hand him a gold medal, and then he raises his hands in a victory pose.

You get a second-place ribbon. Better luck next year.

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This could have been the story of any woman at January’s United States Powerlifting Association Minnesota State Championship.

Despite the countless years of gym time between all of the women there, a man with a single year of training under his belt walked home with not only two women’s gold medals but one of their state records as well.

The man is JayCee Cooper, a 31-year-old amateur weightlifter who describes himself as “queer-n-trans” on his Instagram profile.

 

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His championship victory didn’t sit right with everyone.

The conservative clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson even weighed in on Cooper’s “accomplishment,” in his own sarcastic way.

“Such an impressive accomplishment,” Peterson wrote in a Twitter post. “Defeating all those women. And so quickly. And by such a margin. Miracle? Or narcissism of an incomprehensible quality?”

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After sweeping the competition at the state championship, Cooper’s powerlifting ambitions were halted by an email from USA Powerlifting — the big dog of American lifting federations.

As Cooper revealed in an interview with Compete Network: “The USAPL will not allow me to compete because I am a transfeminine person. And, according to them, it confers some sort of anatomical advantage, even though I’m not sure where they’re getting that ‘science.'”

Despite Cooper’s apparent lack of understanding about the fundamentals of biology, science is pretty clear on the subject of sex differences and physical ability.

Should a transgender be allowed to compete against women in a contest of strength?

A Duke University study found that even Olympian Tori Bowie’s lifetime best 100-meter time (less than 11 seconds — an impressive speed) was shattered by men and boys over 15,000 times in a single year.

And this is just for a 100-meter dash. Strength competitions will obviously have just as large of a disparity, if not a bigger one.

In the Compete Network interview, Cooper acknowledged he’s only been seriously into weight training for about a year. It’s a good bet the women he defeated at the competition have been training much, much longer than that.

Unfortunately for female athletes, it appears as though Cooper’s victory is emblematic of the unfair advantage they may often face in the future.

And leftists, obsessed with “transgender causes,” are abandoning the very women they claim to be supporting.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
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