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Nashville Bomber's Weird Connection to Mystery LA Lady Finally Revealed

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The California woman who was given two homes by suspected Nashville bomber Anthony Quinn Warner was revealed to be the daughter of a friend of his, according to Warner’s former attorney.

Michelle Swing, a 29-year-old music executive in Los Angeles, was given the deeds to two houses by Warner — including the home he was living in — before the Christmas explosion that rocked Nashville, Tennessee, according to the New York Post.

Attorney Ray Throckmorton III, who said he represented Warner in 2018 and 2019, recalled that the suspect told him Swing was “the child of a friend of his.”

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“I remember him saying he knew her mother personally,” Throckmorton told The Tennessean, adding that he “never asked and never made any inquires or any connections as to why he wanted to do that.”

Swing said she knew nothing about the Nov. 25 transfer of the home where Warner was living, and her signature was not present on the deed.

“In the state of Tennessee you can deed property to someone else without their consent or their signature or anything,” Swing told the Daily Mail.

“I didn’t even buy the house, he just deeded it over to me without my knowledge. So this [is] all very weird to me, that’s about all I can say,” she said.

Swing said, “I’ve been told to direct everything else to FBI,” when asked about her connection to Warner.

The executive had previously been in the middle of another property transaction, this time concerning the first house Warner had transferred to her.

In January 2019, Warner deeded Swing a house worth $249,000, that had originally belonged to his father, for free.

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According to the Daily Mail, the house had been the home of Warner’s brother, Steve, for several years. After his brother died leaving no will, Warner reportedly took possession and later deeded the property to Swing.

Warner’s mother, Betty Lane, took her son to court, however, claiming that the property legally belonged to her and that Warner “violated his duty to act in the best interest of his brother.” Once the court ruled in Lane’s favor, Swing signed the property over to her in a quitclaim in July, the New York Post reported.

Throckmorton said he represented Warner during the property suit, until his client fired him.

“He just seemed like he hated life and he hated everything and everybody,” Throckmorton told The Tennessean.

“He was extremely reserved and suspicious and paranoid and distrustful. There was no chitchat with him.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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