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School Official Solicits Donations to Pay Human Trafficker

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Your teen comes home from a day at high school. You ask how the day went.

“It was okay,” the teen said. “We held a fundraiser.”

“Really?” you ask. “That’s nice. For who?”

“A human trafficker.”

That might sound like it’s out of a bad comedy sketch on “Saturday Night Live,” but it’s not.

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On Thursday, Stefani Harvey, an assistant principal at Mount Pleasant High School in Providence, Rhode Island, sent an email out to the school, according to National Review.

Harvey explained that she was helping to raise money to pay off a “Coyote” whose job is to “help people.”

You can’t make this stuff up.

The email was asking teachers and students to raise thousands of dollars to pay off a human trafficker. The coyote — who was likely associated with a Mexican cartel — had recently smuggled one of the school’s students into the U.S.

The email went on to say the student “needs our urgent support to raise another $2,000 to meet his $5,000 goal by February 1st, 2023”.

Who knows where the student came up with the $3,000 already in hand? I’m not sure I want to know.

If it’s too much for you to believe, a representative of the Providence Teachers Union attested to the fact the email was indeed sent on Thursday night.

But then again, you’re probably not that surprised considering what goes on in schools these days.

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Maribeth Calabro, president of the PTU, told radio talk show host Matt Allen, “I was a little taken aback by the contents and fully and completely understanding of your reaction. I engaged the district. I called leadership in the district.”

It was too much to believe. Was it a farce?

Calabro told Allen that the teachers at the school “realized quite quickly that it was not a hack or a misrepresentation or a joke.”

Tiffany Delaney, principal at the high school, responded to the growing controversy in a Friday email.

Should this school official be fired?

“I was informed there was an email seeking financial support for one of our students. I appreciated the faculty and staff contributing to a cause that supports a student, but the nature of the request is not appropriate.”

Inappropriate? Really?

Delaney failed to take the time to mention that coyotes who smuggle people over the southern border with Mexico do not help people. They exploit the vulnerable and dehumanize many of those they are supposed to be “helping.”

Migrant women and girls are often the victims of sexual assault, as reported in The New York Times. Instead of $5,000, these women pay with their bodies. The crimes go unreported more often than not.

Somebody needs to tell officials at the high school that human trafficking is a heinous crime. Holding fundraisers for criminals is not just inappropriate. It makes those who participate complicit in the crime.

Is that what you want your student learning at school? Does it make you wonder what else they’re learning? There’s a good chance that it’s gender theory, LGBT ideology, or how to be a racist.

Whatever happened to reading, writing, and arithmetic?

Home school seems more and more like a great idea each and every day.

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Jack Gist has published books, short stories, poems, essays, and opinion pieces in outlets such as The Imaginative Conservative, Catholic World Report, Crisis Magazine, Galway Review, and others. His genre-bending novel The Yewberry Way: Prayer (2023) is the first installment of a trilogy that explores the relationship between faith and reason. He can be found at jackgistediting.com
Jack Gist has published books, short stories, poems, essays, and opinion pieces in outlets such as The Imaginative Conservative, Catholic World Report, Crisis Magazine, Galway Review, and others. His genre-bending novel The Yewberry Way: Prayer (2023) is the first installment of a trilogy that explores the relationship between faith and reason. He can be found at jackgistediting.com




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