Commentary

Teens Show Up at Capitol, Sing Hymn That Would Make Planned Parenthood Cringe

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Legalized abortion has been one of the most polarizing issues in the United States for decades, but recent bills that have passed in New York or been proposed in other states have pushed it to the forefront again.

One of the states that is considering wildly aggressive abortion bills is Illinois.

Illinois’ HB2495 and HB2467, both introduced earlier this year, seek to advance abortion by leaps and bounds in the state.

HB2495, dubiously described as a “reproductive health act,” would secure abortion as a fundamental right for residents of the state. The bill already has a lengthy list of co-sponsors.

HB2467 goes a step further in pushing the bounds of common decency, and seeks to strip the requirement for parental notification if a minor seeks an abortion.

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Understandably, pro-life groups in the state are appalled.

Six of Illinois’ Catholic bishops were quick to respond with a statement condemning lawmakers who favor the bills.

“As Illinois faces so many pressing issues involving human life and dignity,” the statement reads, “it is incomprehensible that our elected officials have decided the pressing issue of the day is to enhance the chances that the lives of the most vulnerable and voiceless will be taken.”

But the opposition of the Catholic church to abortion started well before the current pro-abortion bills in Illinois.

According to the Christian culture website ChurchPop.com, students from the youth group Crusaders for Life turned out en masse at the Illinois Capitol in Springfield on Jan. 20, 2017, the 44th anniversary of the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.

They filled the cavernous building with the music of a hymn to the Holy Innocents. In Roman Catholicism, the Feast of the Holy Innocents is Dec. 28, a day to commemorate the children of Bethlehem who were slaughtered around the time of Jesus’ birth at the command of Herod, who feared a ruler had been born there who would someday take his place. (Matthew 2:13-18)

The comparison to the abortion industry’s slaughter of innocent children is obvious.

Check out the students’ singing here:

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This video is wholesome, Christian America at its best.

That’s why it’s not unreasonable to think that Planned Parenthood, an organization that’s already launched a “My Body, My Story” campaign targeting young people in Illinois (complete with googly-eyed condoms and injection needles) would not be fond displays like this one by courageous young Christians.

“We see that youth across Illinois have deserved to know what rights they have when accessing health care,” a Planned Parenthood coordinator told the Decatur-based Herald & Review.

“We see it as a need. All youth really deserve to get this information.”

Judging by those singing kids in the state Capitol, some teens in Illinois know all they need to about the real motives of Planned Parenthood.

And with abortion becoming the biggest cultural battleground of the modern era, this awakening could not come at a better time.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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