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Two Dogs and a Cat Found inside Flaming Home, Firefighters Start CPR to Revive Pup

When tragedy happens, sometimes the family pet gets put on the bottom of the totem pole.

We can be so caught up in saving possessions or making sure that our family members are okay that we forget that the dog needs notice.

For firefighters in Manchester, New Hampshire, the family pets were their first and only priority.

With a blaze and smoke rising from the basement, saving the two dogs and one cat trapped inside was the mission.

A passerby noticed smoke coming from the basement of the house and immediately called the fire department. When the fire crew arrived, they were relieved to see that no one was home.

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Then, as they entered the house, they noticed two dogs and one cat still inside. Smoke had overcome the animals, so they carried them to safety.

Manchester District Fire Chief James Michael was on the scene of the single family home.

“There was no one home at the house,” said Michael. “Once we got inside, it looked like it had been going for a while.”

Once outside, the house the pets were evaluated. The Labrador was noticeably affected, but the cat and the second dog, a corgi, were unresponsive.

After the firefighters administered oxygen to the unresponsive animals, the cat became alert, but the corgi was in serious danger. The firefighting crew went beyond the call of duty and began administering CPR to the injured dog.



The technique of giving life-saving CPR to a dog is much like that of a human. Air is blown into the lungs through the mouth and nostril while compressions are giving on the sides of the animal. Firefighters are trained in both types of CPR.

The corgi was revived and all three animals transported to a veterinary clinic close by.

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“They do such a great job getting them here as fast as they can,” said veterinary technician Mary Wiley of the firefighting crew.

“They are trained to administer air to them, and they work on them on the way here.”

The cause of the fire was not determined but the damage is estimated at around $40,000. Still, the loss could have been far worse.

If it had not been for the brave rescue of these animals and the knowledge of the firefighter, this family might have lost their beloved pets. You can’t put a price on that.

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