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Wisconsin, Arizona Certify Results of Presidential Election

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Two battleground states, Wisconsin and Arizona, certified their presidential election results in favor of Joe Biden, even as President Donald Trump’s legal team continued to dispute the results.

Biden’s victory in Wisconsin was certified Monday following a partial recount that only added to his 20,600-vote margin over Trump, who has promised to file a lawsuit challenging the results.

Democratic Gov. Tony Evers signed a certificate to complete the process after the canvass report showing Biden as the winner following the recount was approved by the chairwoman of the bipartisan Wisconsin Elections Commission.

“Today I carried out my duty to certify the November 3rd election,” Evers said in a statement.

“I want to thank our clerks, election administrators, and poll workers across our state for working tirelessly to ensure we had a safe, fair, and efficient election. Thank you for all your good work.”

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Trump now has five days to file a lawsuit, which he promised would come no later than Tuesday.

Trump is mounting a long-shot attempt to overturn the results by disqualifying as many as 238,000 ballots. Trump’s attorneys have alleged that there was widespread fraud and illegal activity.

Earlier Monday, Arizona officials certified Biden’s narrow victory in that state.

Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs and Republican Gov. Doug Ducey both vouched for the integrity of the election before signing off on the results.

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“We do elections well here in Arizona. The system is strong,” Ducey said.

He did not directly address Trump’s claims of irregularities but said the state pulled off a successful election with a mix of in-person and mail-in voting.

Hobbs said Arizona voters should know that the election “was conducted with transparency, accuracy and fairness in accordance with Arizona’s laws and election procedures, despite numerous unfounded claims to the contrary.”

Biden is only the second Democrat in 70 years to win Arizona. He beat Trump by 10,457 votes, or 0.3 percent of the nearly 3.4 million ballots cast.

Even as Hobbs and Ducey certified the election results, Trump lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis met in a Phoenix hotel ballroom a few miles away to lay out claims of irregularities in the vote count in Arizona and elsewhere.

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“The officials certifying have made no effort to find out the truth, which to me, gives the state Legislature the perfect reason to take over the conduct of this election because it’s being conducted irresponsibly and unfairly,” Giuliani said.

Trump berated Ducey on Twitter on Monday night, asking, “Why is he rushing to put a Democrat in office, especially when so many horrible things concerning voter fraud are being revealed at the hearing going on right now.”

Election challenges brought by the Trump campaign or his backers in key battleground states have largely been unsuccessful.


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