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Medics Forced To Intervene After Insect Sting Nearly Ends Bear Grylls' Career

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Allergies can put even the most hardened survivalists in a life-or-death situation, which is exactly what happened to Bear Grylls after a bee sting left medics racing to save him.

The insect stung Grylls during the filming of his new series, “Treasure Island.”

According to the Daily Star, the sting, likely from a bee, sent Grylls into anaphylactic shock.

The survival star tried to continue filming, but medics quickly intervened when it became apparent the sting was turning into something more serious.

To save Grylls’ life, the show’s medics administered an EpiPen to counteract his allergic reaction.

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“I think that Bear is an impressive guy,” said show contestant and brain surgeon Mano Shanmuganathan. “He understands his tasks at hand and knows what he has to achieve.”

“The irony of Bear the survivalist being stung, having the potential of an allergic reaction, and needing to be treated with an EpiPen, was a bizarre moment. That was crazy!”

This isn’t the first time Grylls’ allergies have caused problems during filming.

In 2008, Grylls suffered a similar reaction while trying to harvest honey as part of another show.



The most recent sting occurred as Grylls was transporting contestants to the remote set of “Treasure Island.”

The show, which is a survival-type competition, includes a £100,000 prize (about $121,580) that can be shared by those who find it or kept by a cunning enough solo contestant.

Thankfully for Grylls and the contestants, the survival competition will continue.

Though a minor inconvenience for many, bee stings can be life-threatening for those with allergies.

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According to statistics compiled by the Centers for Disease Control, wasp, hornet and bee stings account for roughly 60 U.S. deaths a year. When life-saving measures like epinephrine injections are not available, the stings can be incredibly fatal.

Grylls, who has an allergy to bee stings, was fortunate to have trained and equipped medics on hand. This could have easily been a career-ending, and possibly fatal, injury.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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