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Teen Found Chopped to Pieces, ICE Blames Social Justice-Obsessed County

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Several weeks after a teenager’s body was found hacked to pieces, Immigration and Customs Enforcement says the horrific crime could have been easily avoided if one liberal Washington county had just listened to them.

An ICE spokesperson told The Daily Caller News Foundation that King County ignored a detainer request issued for Carlos Orlando Iraheta-Vega and released the illegal alien from a county jail in November 2018.

The day of his release, Iraheta-Vega was taken into custody on a charge of driving under the influence, only to be released again before ICE could pick him up.

This past August, he was arrested again for an alleged DUI, and released once more.

Less than a month after Iraheta-Vega’s latest release, a teen boy was found dead in a river. His body had been hacked into pieces with a machete and bashed with a baseball bat.

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According to the Seattle-area outlet KING, detectives identified Iraheta-Vega and another man, Rudy Osvaldo Garcia-Hernandez, as suspects. The two men, both alleged MS-13 gang members, are now being held on murder charges.

Authorities say the two alleged murderers originally met with the teen, 16-year-old Juan Carlos Con Guzman, to settle a grievance.

Guzman reportedly agreed to a fistfight with one of the men to resolve the dispute.

After the fight was over, police say Iraheta-Vega grabbed a hidden baseball bat and beat the teen with it.

Should the county's officials be blamed for this murder?

His companion then allegedly sliced the young man’s neck.

ICE says that if King County had honored their detainer, this grisly murder would most likely have never happened.

“This scenario, where sanctuary policies shield criminal aliens who prey on people in the community from immigration enforcement, is becoming all too common,”  enforcement, is becoming all too common,” ICE spokeswoman Tanya Roman told The DCNF.

“As Iraheta-Vega’s crimes increased in severity, local officials chose to release him, time and time again, without notification to ICE, a simple process that could have potentially prevented this crime.”

In a cruel twist, it appears Con Guzman may have lost his life thanks to King County’s obsession with social justice.

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The county’s immigrant and refugee commission’s stated mission includes “supporting the vision for social justice for immigrant and refugee communities in King County.”

Of course, any kind of “justice” that leads to the savage death of a 16-year-old boy isn’t justice at all.

Unfortunately for residents of the county, it doesn’t look like the local government is going to stop pandering to illegal immigrants anytime soon.

Iraheta-Vega isn’t the first illegal immigrant the county has released without notifying ICE, and he likely won’t be the last.

If King County had placed its own citizens over their obsession with social justice, Con Guzman might be alive right now.

Instead, his family has to pay the price every day for King County’s ignorance.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
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English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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