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Here's Video After Video of Democrats Invoking 'Lynching' Before They Decided It's Wrong

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President Donald Trump’s “lynching” tweet was far from his best moment. There was plenty of outrage, which wasn’t surprising.

What was surprising was how often Democrats invoked lynching as a metaphor in the bad old days, particularly during the Clinton impeachment process.

So, in case you missed it, here was the Trump tweet which caused all of the commotion:

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“So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights,” he tweeted Tuesday.

“All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here – a lynching. But we will WIN!”

Do you think using the term "lynching" as a metaphor for impeachment is offensive?

Everyone on the left pretty much lost it over this one — and one would expect that they would. However, there were plenty of them who had previously used lynching language to describe political maneuvers they disagreed with.

The most notable of these was former Vice President Joe Biden, who had chastised Trump already: “Impeachment is not ‘lynching,’ it is part of our Constitution. Our country has a dark, shameful history with lynching, and to even think about making this comparison is abhorrent. It’s despicable,” the 2020 Democratic presidential candidate tweeted.

Impeachment is not “lynching.” Except, of course, when it is:

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Biden would apologize for this:

Meanwhile, here’s Jim McDermott, who served in the House of Representatives until 2017, also speaking about the Clinton impeachment:

Rep. Danny Davis of Illinois, who’s still in the House, compared the 1998 Clinton impeachment to “impeaching affirmative action, impeaching women’s rights.” He also called it a “lynching in the people’s House.”

Rep. Gregory Meeks of New York, meanwhile, said that “indeed it is a political lynching.”

Then-Senate Minority Whip Harry Reid of Nevada, meanwhile, also called it a “lynch mob.”

And then there’s Jerry Nadler:

While it wasn’t on video, Rep. Jerry Nadler, now the head of the House Judiciary Committee, said in 1998, “I wish we could get this over with quickly. … In pushing the process, in pushing the arguments of fairness and due process the Republicans so far have been running a lynch mob,” according to Breitbart.

So, these are the people who thought that lynching was a good metaphor for impeachment even when it was clearly more justified given the specter of perjury.

Now, they’re either the ones expressing outrage, or they’re allied with people who are.

It’s not that times have changed.

We knew in 1998 that “lynching” or “lynch mob” was an awfully evil thing to invoke.

Back then, though, the media didn’t care.

Now it’s in hyperdrive over Trump’s remark.

The media ought to admit they dropped the ball on Democrats’ tactics to shield Bill Clinton 21 years ago or that they simply don’t care when there’s not a narrative to weave.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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