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Young Woman Posts Heartbreaking Words About Teen Sister Who Was Abducted On Way to School

I can’t even imagine what it would be like to live without either of my siblings. Despite our bickering when we were younger, I love both of my brothers dearly and would be heartbroken to be without either of them.

Sadly, this is a reality for Rosey Pinson whose younger sister Pearl was kidnapped off a walkway in Vallejo, California, almost two years ago on May 25, 2016.

Even though her kidnapper was killed in a shootout with police, Pearl has still not been found.

“It’s 22 months of pain and tears,” Rosey continued. “But I will never give up until she is found.”

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Every 25th of the month the Pinson family goes and cleans up the overpass where Pearl was last seen alive.

The 15-year-old was on her way to her normal bus stop when she was taken by 19-year-old Fernando Castro. According to witnesses, she was bloody and screaming for help when she was taken.

“Every month we either come here or to a favorite place of hers, like the Glen Cove Park or the baseball field at Wilson Park, and do something for her … a barbecue or something,” Rosey told The Reporter.

In her post shared by Frank Somerville of KTVU, Rosey said that as sisters, she and Pearl fought but also had “good moments” together.

“I can explain so much about my sister but it just makes me miss her more,” she said.

Rosey then began to talk about her sister’s abductor. “The devil took a young man and forced him to take my only sister. Then the devil called that young man to his grave.” She added that the “abductor’s life was taken way too soon.”

“Which makes my family and my life a million times worse because we can’t ask him where he took her, what did u to do her and mainly who did you give her to?”

“I go to sleep every night hoping that I get woken up to a phone call saying she was found, but that still hasn’t happened,” she wrote. “I get nightmares of the day it happen. For me it’s like a song that you can’t get out of your head.

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“Pearl I want you to know I love you deeply and I will find you. I’m so sorry I wasn’t able to save you from him.”

Our thoughts and prayers are with this family, and we hope that Pearl is found soon.

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Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. A University of Oregon graduate, Erin has conducted research in data journalism and contributed to various publications as a writer and editor.
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. She grew up in San Diego, California, proceeding to attend the University of Oregon and graduate with honors holding a degree in journalism. During her time in Oregon, Erin was an associate editor for Ethos Magazine and a freelance writer for Eugene Magazine. She has conducted research in data journalism, which has been published in the book “Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future.” Erin is an avid runner with a heart for encouraging young girls and has served as a coach for the organization Girls on the Run. As a writer and editor, Erin strives to promote social dialogue and tell the story of those around her.
Birthplace
Tucson, Arizona
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated with Honors
Education
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oregon
Books Written
Contributor for Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future
Location
Prescott, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English, French
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Health, Entertainment, Faith




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