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Obama, Eric Holder Join Forces in New 'All on the Line' Initiative for Democrat Power

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This is one combination American politics could do without.

The last time Barack Obama and Eric Holder teamed up, it was as president and attorney general, presiding over years of scandals that the establishment media made a concentrated effort to ignore.

Now, they’ve reportedly joined forces to turn their attention to one of the most basic elements of American democracy — what could go wrong?

In a Twitter post on Monday, the former president went public with his new priority, an effort with Holder called “Redistricting U” that aims to build cadres of activists focused on how congressional district lines are drawn.

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According to Fox News, “Redistricting U” was formed in February, when Obama merged the Organizing for Action organization with Holder’s National Redistricting Action Fund.

It’s part of a larger, Holder-run campaign called “All on the Line,” a group whose website claims to fight “rigged electoral maps drawn with surgical precision by politicians to preserve their party’s political power and silence the will of the people.”

Do you think Obama and Holder are a dangerous combination?

Naturally, the Democratic spin is that the party is only interested in fair play, ensuring that congressional districts are drawn without partisan interests in mind.

But former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who learned a thing or two about vicious Democratic politics at the state level during eight tumultuous years in office (including a failed effort to oust him in a recall vote), called out Holder in a Twitter post last week.

Seriously, no one American who was sentient during the Obama administration could believe that the rabidly partisan now-ex-president would be doing anything other than trying to build up the Democratic Party.

(Possibly, he’s trying to atone for the fact that his presidency was a disaster for any Democrat not named Barack Obama — as the party lost more than 1,000 elected seats from 2009 to 2017, Fox reported near the end of the Obama administration.)

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Whatever the case, many Americans responding to Obama’s Twitter post had clearly seen enough of the 44th president while he was in the White House — or making news more recently buying spectacular property on Martha’s Vineyard.

They didn’t want to see him back now.

It would be impossible to tell from the fawning media coverage (if there is justice, future historians will mark the Obama presidency as a truly low point in what used to be journalism in the United States), but Obama and Holder’s time in power was a plagued by scandals, from “Fast & Furious” to spying on the media to abusing American taxpayers trying to exercise their rights to political activism.

The United States was lucky to get through it with its Constitution intact. (The midterm election of 2010 that brought Republicans to power in the House might have been the only thing that saved it.)

A new Obama-Holder combination now is one thing American politics can do without.

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Joe has spent more than 30 years as a reporter, copy editor and metro desk editor in newsrooms in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Florida. He's been with Liftable Media since 2015.
Joe has spent more than 30 years as a reporter, copy editor and metro editor in newsrooms in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Florida. He's been with Liftable Media since 2015. Largely a product of Catholic schools, who discovered Ayn Rand in college, Joe is a lifelong newspaperman who learned enough about the trade to be skeptical of every word ever written. He was also lucky enough to have a job that didn't need a printing press to do it.
Birthplace
Philadelphia
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