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Pilots' Accounts of UFO Raise Serious Questions - CNN Coverage Sounds Downright Spooky

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Editor’s Note: Our readers responded strongly to this story when it originally ran; we’re reposting it here in case you missed it.

Pilots sent aloft to learn about the object shot down off Alaska’s northern coast on Feb. 10 could not agree on what they were seeing, according to a new report.

The object was first detected the day before, with F-35 fighter aircraft sent to learn more about it, according to CNN.

What they came back with were differing stories, CNN reported, citing a “source briefed on the intelligence.”

Some pilots claimed the object “interfered with their sensors,” the source said.

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Others were baffled as to how the object was moving at its altitude of 40,000 feet.

“When they looked at the object they could identify no identifiable propulsion system and they did not know how it was actually staying in the air,” CNN’s Natasha Bertrand told the network’s Jake Tapper.

Is our government using the UFO sightings/shoot-downs to distract from something more important?

According to ABC, a U.S. official it did not name described the object as “cylindrical and silver-ish gray.”

“[I]t wasn’t ‘flying’ with any sort of propulsion, so if that is ‘balloon-like’ well — we just don’t have enough at this point,” the official said.

In an interview Feb. 13 on ABC, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said he’d been told that all the objects seen so far have been balloons.

“The military and the intelligence are focused like a laser on, first, gathering and accumulating the information, then coming up with a comprehensive analysis of what went on before, what’s going on now and what could go on in the future,” he told “This Week” host George Stephanopoulos.

National Security Council spokesman John Kirby said that few details about the object’s purpose have been discerned, according to The Washington Post.

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“We don’t know what entity owns this object,” Kirby said. “There’s no indication it’s from a nation or an institution or an individual.”

Legislators from Alaska have reacted angrily to the presence of multiple objects that have traveled over Alaska, according to The Washington Post.

“At what point do we say a … spy balloon coming from China is a threat to our sovereignty? It should be the moment it crosses the line. And that line is Alaska,” Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski said at a hearing, the Post reported.

In a statement, the state’s Republican senator, Dan Sullivan, stressed the need for adequate national defense — and the need to arm the military accordingly.

“We also need to appropriately equip our military in Alaska with the sensors and aircraft needed to detect and, if necessary, destroy everything from slow-moving balloons to hypersonic missiles,” the Sullivan statement said.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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