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Lifestyle & Human Interest

The Government Will Pay You $1,000 Dollars To Adopt a Wild Horse

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Hold onto your horses because the Bureau of Land Management is offering qualified adopters $1,000 dollars to adopt a wild horse or burro through their Wild Horse and Burro program.

The program is aimed at managing wild horse and burro herd populations throughout the United States.

The BLM “oversees 26.9 million acres of public lands for wild horses, wild burros and other species,” according to their Twitter account.

They are tasked with managing the animal populations to ensure there are enough resources for all species.

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Wild horse and burro populations in 2018 were over three times the amount that the land can support, according to The Idaho Statesman.

Would you adopt a wild horse?

“High costs and a growing number of unadopted and unsold animals in BLM holding facilities have hindered the agency’s ability to reduce overpopulation in recent years,” The Idaho Statesman reported.

“Chronic overpopulation increases the risk of damage to rangeland resources through overgrazing, and raises the chances of starvation and thirst for animals in overpopulated herds.”

Potential adopters must agree to follow the terms and conditions of adoption, which include proper shelter, food, health care and willingness to work with an untamed animal.

Qualified adopters also agree to open inspections for one year so the BLM can ensure horses are being cared for in a proper environment.

Adopters receive $500 dollars within 60 days of the adoption date and another $500 within 60 days of the title date, which happens approximately one year after adoption.

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“We understand that adopting a wild horse or burro represents a commitment. The incentive is designed to help with the adopter’s initial training and humane care,” BLM Deputy Director of Programs and Policy Brian Steed told Reno Gazette-Journal.

“I encourage anyone who has considered adopting a wild horse or burro to join the thousands of owners who have provided good homes to more than 245,000 wild horses or burros since 1971.”

Interested applicants can learn more about the program by visiting the website for the Bureau of Land Management Wild Horse and Burro program.

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A graduate of Grand Canyon University, Kim Davis has been writing for The Western Journal since 2015, focusing on lifestyle stories.
Kim Davis began writing for The Western Journal in 2015. Her primary topics cover family, faith, and women. She has experience as a copy editor for the online publication Thoughtful Women. Kim worked as an arts administrator for The Phoenix Symphony, writing music education curriculum and leading community engagement programs throughout the region. She holds a degree in music education from Grand Canyon University with a minor in eating tacos.
Birthplace
Page, Arizona
Education
Bachelor of Science in Music Education
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Lifestyle & Human Interest




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